Nitrous oxide production in sputum from cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

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Nitrous oxide production in sputum from cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection. / Kolpen, Mette; Kühl, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus Ernst; Hansen, Christine Rønne; Liengaard, Lars; Kharazmi, Arsalan; Pressler, Tanja; Høiby, Niels; Jensen, Peter Østrup.

In: PLOS ONE, Vol. 9, No. 1, 2014, p. e84353.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Kolpen, M, Kühl, M, Bjarnsholt, T, Moser, CE, Hansen, CR, Liengaard, L, Kharazmi, A, Pressler, T, Høiby, N & Jensen, PØ 2014, 'Nitrous oxide production in sputum from cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection', PLOS ONE, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. e84353. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0084353

APA

Kolpen, M., Kühl, M., Bjarnsholt, T., Moser, C. E., Hansen, C. R., Liengaard, L., ... Jensen, P. Ø. (2014). Nitrous oxide production in sputum from cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection. PLOS ONE, 9(1), e84353. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0084353

Vancouver

Kolpen M, Kühl M, Bjarnsholt T, Moser CE, Hansen CR, Liengaard L et al. Nitrous oxide production in sputum from cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection. PLOS ONE. 2014;9(1):e84353. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0084353

Author

Kolpen, Mette ; Kühl, Michael ; Bjarnsholt, Thomas ; Moser, Claus Ernst ; Hansen, Christine Rønne ; Liengaard, Lars ; Kharazmi, Arsalan ; Pressler, Tanja ; Høiby, Niels ; Jensen, Peter Østrup. / Nitrous oxide production in sputum from cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection. In: PLOS ONE. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. e84353.

Bibtex

@article{57d4e8585a814e869bb509f6624a29ba,
title = "Nitrous oxide production in sputum from cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection",
abstract = "Chronic lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major severe complication in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, where P. aeruginosa persists and grows in biofilms in the endobronchial mucus under hypoxic conditions. Numerous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) surround the biofilms and create local anoxia by consuming the majority of O2 for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa acquires energy for growth in anaerobic endobronchial mucus by denitrification, which can be demonstrated by production of nitrous oxide (N2O), an intermediate in the denitrification pathway. We measured N2O and O2 with electrochemical microsensors in 8 freshly expectorated sputum samples from 7 CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa infection. The concentrations of NO3(-) and NO2(-) in sputum were estimated by the Griess reagent. We found a maximum median concentration of 41.8 µM N2O (range 1.4-157.9 µM N2O). The concentration of N2O in the sputum was higher below the oxygenated layers. In 4 samples the N2O concentration increased during the initial 6 h of measurements before decreasing for approximately 6 h. Concomitantly, the concentration of NO3(-) decreased in sputum during 24 hours of incubation. We demonstrate for the first time production of N2O in clinical material from infected human airways indicating pathogenic metabolism based on denitrification. Therefore, P. aeruginosa may acquire energy for growth by denitrification in anoxic endobronchial mucus in CF patients. Such ability for anaerobic growth may be a hitherto ignored key aspect of chronic P. aeruginosa infections that can inform new strategies for treatment and prevention.",
author = "Mette Kolpen and Michael K{\"u}hl and Thomas Bjarnsholt and Moser, {Claus Ernst} and Hansen, {Christine R{\o}nne} and Lars Liengaard and Arsalan Kharazmi and Tanja Pressler and Niels H{\o}iby and Jensen, {Peter {\O}strup}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0084353",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "e84353",
journal = "P L o S One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nitrous oxide production in sputum from cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

AU - Kolpen, Mette

AU - Kühl, Michael

AU - Bjarnsholt, Thomas

AU - Moser, Claus Ernst

AU - Hansen, Christine Rønne

AU - Liengaard, Lars

AU - Kharazmi, Arsalan

AU - Pressler, Tanja

AU - Høiby, Niels

AU - Jensen, Peter Østrup

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Chronic lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major severe complication in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, where P. aeruginosa persists and grows in biofilms in the endobronchial mucus under hypoxic conditions. Numerous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) surround the biofilms and create local anoxia by consuming the majority of O2 for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa acquires energy for growth in anaerobic endobronchial mucus by denitrification, which can be demonstrated by production of nitrous oxide (N2O), an intermediate in the denitrification pathway. We measured N2O and O2 with electrochemical microsensors in 8 freshly expectorated sputum samples from 7 CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa infection. The concentrations of NO3(-) and NO2(-) in sputum were estimated by the Griess reagent. We found a maximum median concentration of 41.8 µM N2O (range 1.4-157.9 µM N2O). The concentration of N2O in the sputum was higher below the oxygenated layers. In 4 samples the N2O concentration increased during the initial 6 h of measurements before decreasing for approximately 6 h. Concomitantly, the concentration of NO3(-) decreased in sputum during 24 hours of incubation. We demonstrate for the first time production of N2O in clinical material from infected human airways indicating pathogenic metabolism based on denitrification. Therefore, P. aeruginosa may acquire energy for growth by denitrification in anoxic endobronchial mucus in CF patients. Such ability for anaerobic growth may be a hitherto ignored key aspect of chronic P. aeruginosa infections that can inform new strategies for treatment and prevention.

AB - Chronic lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major severe complication in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, where P. aeruginosa persists and grows in biofilms in the endobronchial mucus under hypoxic conditions. Numerous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) surround the biofilms and create local anoxia by consuming the majority of O2 for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa acquires energy for growth in anaerobic endobronchial mucus by denitrification, which can be demonstrated by production of nitrous oxide (N2O), an intermediate in the denitrification pathway. We measured N2O and O2 with electrochemical microsensors in 8 freshly expectorated sputum samples from 7 CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa infection. The concentrations of NO3(-) and NO2(-) in sputum were estimated by the Griess reagent. We found a maximum median concentration of 41.8 µM N2O (range 1.4-157.9 µM N2O). The concentration of N2O in the sputum was higher below the oxygenated layers. In 4 samples the N2O concentration increased during the initial 6 h of measurements before decreasing for approximately 6 h. Concomitantly, the concentration of NO3(-) decreased in sputum during 24 hours of incubation. We demonstrate for the first time production of N2O in clinical material from infected human airways indicating pathogenic metabolism based on denitrification. Therefore, P. aeruginosa may acquire energy for growth by denitrification in anoxic endobronchial mucus in CF patients. Such ability for anaerobic growth may be a hitherto ignored key aspect of chronic P. aeruginosa infections that can inform new strategies for treatment and prevention.

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0084353

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0084353

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 24465406

VL - 9

SP - e84353

JO - P L o S One

JF - P L o S One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 105880507